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Pondering Excellence in Teaching

What Does it Take to Respond to Student Thinking in the Moment?

Supporting Teacher Learning of Responsive Instructional Practices

Wednesday, 17 January 2018 - 4:30pm
Location: 
CERAS 527

Much of teaching is improvisational. While teachers can anticipate common misconceptions or the ideas that may emerge during instruction, they cannot plan for every interaction or question. Teachers must draw on their own expertise to respond to the specific student thinking that surfaces in daily classroom discussion. What does it take to respond to students thinking in productive ways, when doing so cannot be planned for in advance? How do we support teachers learning to respond so that they build on students’ thinking as it emerges? In this talk, we’ll explore the results of a study of elementary mathematics teachers learning to respond to their students’ thinking in the moment through an embedded professional development structure, side-by-side coaching. We’ll discuss the eight practices and dispositions teachers developed as they learned to respond to students’ thinking, and consider the implications for supporting teacher learning of responsiveness in other contexts.

Contact Information

Chemistry for Social Justice

Course Objective: 

REGISTER

In the course, participants will:

  • explore what social justice means and what it looks like in the context of chemistry teaching
  • examine why social justice is not often addressed in chemistry classrooms
  • develop and enact a phenomenon-based lesson sequence with social justice framing
  • improve the lesson sequence through the Lesson Study model
  • develop a community of practice with like-minded teachers 

The course will meet for two days in the summer to introduce theoretical frameworks and practical tools for developing science instructional sequences around social justice issues.  Teams of 5-6 participants will be formed (around geography and interest) to design an instructional sequence to enact in their classrooms with the support of a PD facilitator.  Teams will begin planning their instruction in the summer session and continue over virtual platforms that will be introduced in the PD.  Participants will enact the instructional sequence in their contexts and meet twice during the course of the school year to revise the sequence through the Lesson Study model.  The full group will meet once in the spring to share their lesson sequence and reflect on the revision process and their experience in the classroom. 

Keywords: chemistry, social justice, lesson study, phenomena, teams, instructional sequence, instructional design

Audience:

  • Participants from middle and high school contexts are welcome.
  • Participants should be ready to implement an instructional sequence in their classroom.  
  • Participants should be prepared to work with their team through the school year.

Dates & Times

Summer Workshop

  • Aug 4 & 5, 2017
  • 9:00a - 4:30p

School Year Component

  • Two meetings (times vary)
  • Spring whole group meeting
Format of Course: 2-day summer workshop at Stanford University, 2 school-year virtual or in-person small group meetings, and 1 spring follow-up day at Stanford University

Cost: $70 per teacher

includes light breakfast and lunch

Credits: 2, $77 additional fee to obtain credit

Certificates of completion provided to all participants upon completion of the entire professional learning experience.

Status: Application opens May 15, 2017. Participants accepted on a rolling basis until June 30, 2017.
Course Facilitators: 

Sara Dozier is a Ph.D. student in Curriculum and Teacher Education at Stanford University where she studies how to create a window into student sense-making about natural phenomena. As a high school teacher, she sought to create authentic and equitable opportunities for her students to reignite their wonder and creativity as they explored the world though a scientific lens. While leading professional learning, she seeks to inspire and empower teachers of science to create learning experiences that are meaningful for their students and context. Sara earned a B.A. in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz and an M.S. in Biological Science from the University of California, San Diego. In addition to teaching high school, she worked as a biological researcher and as a science coordinator at the Alameda County Office of Education.

Emily Reigh is a Ph.D. student in Science Education.  She studies discourse in elementary science classrooms, with a particular focus on how students engage in the practice of argumentation.  She taught high school chemistry (general, AP and IB) for ten years in the United States and Egypt.  At Stanford, she has coached teachers, worked in planning for the ChemEx^2 program and developed assessment items for the NGSS.  Emily has earned a B.S in Chemistry and a B.A. in Letters from the University of Oklahoma and an M.A. in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from the American University in Cairo.

Kathryn Ribay is a Ph.D. student in Science Education at Stanford University. She studies how to engage science teachers in thinking about equity in their work and incorporating culturally relevant teaching into the science classroom. Before coming to Stanford, Kathryn spent nine years teaching chemistry, physics, integrated science, and environmental biology at public high schools in New Jersey. Kathryn earned a B.A. in Chemistry from Harvard University, an Ed.M. in School and Instructional Leadership from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and an M.S. in Chemistry from Rutgers-Camden University.

History of the Americas

Mexican Revolution and Nation-Building
Course Objective: 

In July 2016, the California State Board of Education adopted a revised History-Social Science curriculum framework for grades K-12. The new framework reflects the struggles and progress of Chicanos and Latinos in the US, as well as major historical events in Latin America, including a focus on Mexico and the Mexican Revolution in 10th grade.  In this course, historians from one of Mexico’s leading universities, El Colegio de México, will join US scholars to provide rich content knowledge on the Mexican Revolution and nation-building. Topics may include women of the Revolution, Mexican muralists, and US-Mexican political history.  We will explore how to use primary sources, literature, and scholarly texts to build curriculum that reflects the new History-Social Science framework and teaches students to think critically about key historical events.  Teachers will have the opportunity to experience being students again while deepening and broadening their content knowledge.

Keywords: latin american history, mexican revolution, CA history standards, curriculum, mexico, nation-building, history PD

Audience: Designed for middle school and high school History and Social Science teachers Dates & Times:

Jul 31 - Aug 4, 2017

  • Mon | 10:00a - 4:00p
  • Tue - Thu | 9:00a - 4:00p
  • Fri | 9:00a - 1:30p
Format of Course: In-person at Stanford University with follow-up virtual learning communities throughout the school year

Cost*: 

  • $400 (Individual)
  • $350 (Group - 3 or more teachers from the same school or district)

This course is offered at a reduced fee thanks to the support from the US Department of Education's Title VI and the Stanford Center for Latin American Studies. 

Units: 2

To obtain an official transcript with your units there is a $77 fee. Registration for units will take place at the end of the course for attendance purposes.  All participants receive course completion certificates. 

Status: Registration opens Friday, Feb 17, 4:00p PT

*Please note: The cost for this course includes morning coffee/tea service, lunch, and a reception. This cost does not include lodging or transportation. Please see the Festival Location, Lodging, & Transportation page.   


Connecting teachers from around the globe to share and grow in teaching excellence. This course is part of the Stanford Teaching Festival (STF). The STF aims to bring together teachers from varied classrooms and contexts worldwide. Teachers participate in a common, in-person, high-quality professional learning experience over the summer, and are provided with the resources, tools, and support to engage and grow with one another in meaningful learning communities throughout the school year.


Course Facilitators: 

Angela Estrella is a Professional Development Associate and Instructional History Coach for the Hollyhock Fellowship Program. She is also working on TELOS, a GSE initiative to advance equity through evidence-based learning opportunities. In addition to her work at Stanford, Angela works part-time as a professional development facilitator for Overfelt High School in San Jose and is a Teacher in Residence for Imagine K12, an incubator for educational technology startups. Prior to joining CSET, Angela taught history for 9 years and served as an educational technology mentor and instructional coach. angelaes@stanford.edu


Guest Speakers

Juanita Darling is an Associate Professor and Director of the Latin American Studies Minor. She leads the Latin America and Alternative Research Methods in International Relations seminars, as well as teaching undergraduate classes in Latin American Policy, U.S.-Central America Relations, IR Analysis & Application, and International Media Politics.

She received her Ph.D. in Mass Communication with a Latin American Studies Certificate from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill after a long journalism career, including stints as Los Angeles Times San Salvador Bureau Chief and Mexico City correspondent. She wrote Latin America, Media, & Revolution: Communication in Modern Mesoamerica (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) and, more recently, “The Eagle and the Sun: Shaping Press Philosophy in Early Mexico, 1823-1827.” Journalism History, 36:4 (Spring 2011), 228-237, reflecting her interest in Latin American Media, revolutionary media, and social movements.
She is active in the Latin American Studies Association, International Communications Association, Red de Historiadores de la Prensa y el Periodismo en Iberoamérica, and American Journalism Historians Association. Her most recent research project involves Latin American Media Philosophy, with emphasis on alternative media, particularly community radio, and the relationship between media and social movements.

Erika Pani  is research professor at the Center for Historical Studies at El Colegio de México, where she earned her PhD. She works on the political history of Mexico and the United States during the nineteenth century. Her published works include: Para mexicanizar el Segundo Imperio: El imaginario político de los imperialistas(El Colegio de México/Instituto Mora, 2001), Para pertenecer a la gran familia mexicana. Procesos de naturalización en el siglo XIX (El Colegio de México, 2015) and Historia mínima de Estados Unidos de América (El Colegio de México / Turner, 2016). She has edited Conservadurismo y derechas en la historia de México (CONACULTA/Fondo de Cultura económica, 2009), and Migración y ciudadanía. Construyendo naciones en América del norte (El Colegio de México, 2017).

Aurora Gomez Galvarriato Freer earned her PhD in history at Harvard University. She was an investigative professor in the Economics Division at the Center for Economic Teaching and Research A.C. (CIDE) for several years, and was also General Director of the General National Archives from 2009 to 2013. In addition, she has been a Visiting Scholar at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Harvard and a professor at ITAM. She is currently a member of the National System of Researchers Level II. Dr. Freer specializes in the economic and social history of Mexico. Her principal lines of investigation include the exploration of industrialization in Mexico and Latin America, the history of business and work, the economic and social impacts of the Mexican Revolution, and the changing standard of living in Mexico. She is currently researching the technologic, labor, and business history of maize tortilla production in Mexico.

Graciela Márquez is a professor at the Center for Historical Studies at El Colegio de México. She holds a Ph.D. in History from Harvard University, and has lectured in a diverse range of universities across the United States and Mexico, such as UNAM, University of Chicago, and Harvard University. Her research fields of interest are fiscal history, inequality and the estimation of historical series of Mexican GDP. Her main works focuses on the economic history of Mexico and Latin America from late nineteenth century to contemporary times. Professor Marquez has participated in various academic committees, refereed articles for professional journals and served in editorial boards.


This series is sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, a center in the Stanford Global Studies Division, and is partially underwritten with funds from the U.S. Department of Education Title VI program.

Understanding Accomplished Teaching

Course Objective: 

What does accomplished teaching look like in your field? This course offers an opportunity to explore the National Board standards written by and for teachers. Through interactive collaborative activities, you will analyze and reflect upon your teaching practice to develop a clearer picture of what you’re doing and what you need to do.  This is a critical first step for any teacher thinking of pursuing National Board Certification and for any teacher interested in long-term professional growth. You will come away from this course with a clear idea of your next steps in developing your accomplished teaching practice.

Note: Any teacher who completes this course, decides to pursue National Board Certification, and attend the NBRC Candidate Support program will receive a $200 discount towards their candidate support fees.

Keywords: national board professional teaching standards, NBPTS, National Board Certification, teaching practice, accomplished teaching

Audience: Designed for teachers of all grades and content areas

Dates & Times: Jul 31 - Aug 4, 2017

  • Mon | 10:00a - 4:00p
  • Tue - Thu | 9:00a - 4:00p
  • Fri | 9:00a - 1:30p
Format of Course: In-person at Stanford University with follow-up virtual learning communities throughout the school year

Cost: 

  • $750 (Individual)
  • $700 (Group - 3 or more teachers from the same school or district)
Units: 2 Status: Registration opens Tuesday, Jan 17, 4:00p PT

*Please note: The cost for this course includes morning coffee/tea service, lunch, and a reception. This cost does not include lodging or transportation. Please see the Festival Location, Lodging, & Transportation page.  


Connecting teachers from around the globe to share and grow in teaching excellence. This course is part of the Stanford Teaching Festival (STF). The STF aims to bring together teachers from varied classrooms and contexts worldwide. Teachers participate in a common, in-person, high-quality professional learning experience over the summer, and are provided with the resources, tools, and support to engage and grow with one another in meaningful learning communities throughout the school year.


Course Facilitators: 

Linda Bauld is the Director of the National Board Resource Center (NBRC) at Stanford University. In her role as Director, she administers the National Board candidate support program and acts as a resource to National Board support networks in California.  She also coordinates the center’s efforts to partner with the California Teachers Association and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards in various projects that promote teacher leadership opportunities and act as a resource for teachers throughout California.

Constructing & Critiquing Mathematical Arguments

Course Objective: 

Constructing viable arguments and critiquing the reasoning of others (CCSS.MP3) is a vital standard of mathematical practice in the Common Core; it is also a call to action to expand our definition of proof from a process generally limited to Geometry classes to the broader, more social mathematical habit of mind of "convincing your skeptical peers," a habit that can be practiced in every math classroom each and every day. In this course, we will share, reflect upon, and develop classroom structures, tasks, teacher moves, and assessments to help make this value visible and effective in helping student sensemaking. We will explore how to help students construct informal mathematical arguments and explanations, along with how and when to make these arguments more rigorous. We will also look at a crucial complement to constructing arguments: building a classroom culture of skeptical peers who critically examine, respond to, and build on the reasoning and arguments of others. 

Course participants will actively engage in doing, making sense of, and reflecting upon mathematics and teaching. Our goal is for this course to be challenging (in a good way) both mathematically and pedagogically.

Keywords: mathematical practices, common core, mathematical arguments, proof, CCSS.MP3, mathematics, Common Core, sensemaking

Audience: Middle and high school math teachers

Dates & Times: Jul 31 - Aug 4, 2017

  • Mon | 10:00a - 4:00p
  • Tue - Thu | 9:00a - 4:00p
  • Fri | 9:00a - 1:30p
Format of Course: In-person at Stanford University, with follow-up virtual learning communities throughout the school year

Cost*:

  • $750 (Individual)
  • $700 (Group - 3 or more teachers from the same school or district)
Units: 2 Status: Registration opens Tuesday, Jan 17, 4:00p PT

*Please note: The cost for this course includes morning coffee/tea service, lunch, and a reception. This cost does not include lodging or transportation. Please see the Festival Location, Lodging, & Transportation page.  


Connecting teachers from around the globe to share and grow in teaching excellence. This course is part of the Stanford Teaching Festival (STF). The STF aims to bring together teachers from varied classrooms and contexts worldwide. Teachers participate in a common, in-person, high-quality professional learning experience over the summer, and are provided with the resources, tools, and support to engage and grow with one another in meaningful learning communities throughout the school year. 


Course Facilitators: 

Anna Blinstein is passionate about mathematics education. She has a B.A. in Mathematics and Molecular Biology and is a graduate of the Stanford Teacher Education Program, where she became interested in how students construct mathematical understanding. Anna has been teaching math to middle and high-school aged students for 13 years and is a founding teacher of the Nueva Upper School, where she works on developing curriculum and teaching methodology based on rich tasks, projects, and modeling activities.

Avery Pickford is currently a fifth- and sixth-grade math teacher at the Nueva School in Hillsborough, CA. He has taught math and science for eighteen years to students ranging from third grade to graduate school. He enjoys leading and participating in hands-on professional development and is always eager to discuss mathematics as a verb.

Logic is Fundamental

An Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Course Objective: 

WHY LOGIC?

Logic - being able to reason clearly - is fundamental to almost everything students do:

  • The subjects they study; the professions they pursue. Computer programming, mathematics, the sciences, social sciences, the humanities, the arts, medicine, law all require students to read, write, and think critically.
  • What you decide. Advertisers, politicians, companies, and organizations, friends, family, and experts in a field - all at some time want students to buy their products, vote for them, or support what they believe and want to do. Logic helps to spot the hype, the nonsense, who is wrong and right.
  • How students think and formulate opinions and views. The students use the language of logic to state observations, define concepts, and form theories. They reason to reach conclusions and solve problems all the time.

WHY THIS LOGIC COURSE?

  • The timing is right. Stanford has developed a breakthrough new approach for introducing logic based on Herbrand Semantics that makes this difficult subject accessible to high school students. Read More
  • Learn from worldclass experts in the field. A Stanford Computer Science professor and logician, a seasoned math educator and pedagogy designer,  a former research scientist from NASA who instructs Computer Science & Engineering and coaches the Champion Paly Zero Robotics Team, and a former program director from SRI involved in logic applications and intelligent textbook development.
  • Walk away with ready-to-use, engaging course materials. Our course material contains engaging lectures, team and individual exercises, projects, puzzles, and games.
  • Receive personal attention in a small class setting. Since we're limiting registration to 24 teachers, you will benefit from individual attention and small class size.
  • Learn in a resource-rich environment. Stanford's campus, where we use its classrooms and draw on the resources of Silicon Valley and the Bay Area.

CAN'T JOIN US THIS SUMMER, BUT WANT TO STAY IN TOUCH?

  • The logic team encourages teachers to use their online text book and exercises with students! They also want to stay in touch with teachers who use their materials, and keep teachers updated on professional development opportunities and other announcements. Send them an email to be added to their mailing list!

Keywords: teacher training, Math and Science, STEM, logic, high school, reasoning

Audience: High school math, computer science, and philosophy teachers Dates & Times: Jul 31 - Aug 4, 2017
  • Mon | 10:00a - 4:00p
  • Tue - Thu | 9:00a - 4:00p
  • Fri | 9:00a - 1:30p
Format of Course: In-person at Stanford University with follow-up learning communities throughout the school year

Cost*: 

  • $750 (Individual)
  • $700 (Group - 3 or more teachers from the same school or district)
Units: 2 Status: Registration opens Tuesday, Jan 17, 4:00p PT

*Please note: The cost for this course includes morning coffee/tea service, lunch, and a reception. This cost does not include lodging or transportation. Please see the Festival Location, Lodging, & Transportation page.  


Connecting teachers from around the globe to share and grow in teaching excellence. This course is part of the Stanford Teaching Festival (STF). The STF aims to bring together teachers from varied classrooms and contexts worldwide. Teachers participate in a common, in-person, high-quality professional learning experience over the summer, and are provided with the resources, tools, and support to engage and grow with one another in meaningful learning communities throughout the school year. LEARN MORE


Course Facilitators: 

Evan Rushton is an Instructional Math Coach for the Hollyhock Fellowship Program. He also supports the research of Technology for Equity in Learning Opportunities at Stanford (TELOS). Prior to CSET, Evan taught math for 8 years in Northeast Los Angeles; serving as department chair and Algebra Project cohort teacher. After earning his M.A. in Education with a focus on Learning, Design, and Technology from Stanford he entered the learning game industry to advise edtech entrepreneurs, develop feedback systems for games, and write instructional materials for teachers. 

Chris Lee Kuszmaul is the lead teacher of Computer Science and Engineering at Palo Alto High School. A former Senior Research Scientist at NASA, he is the head coach of the World Champion Paly Zero Robotics team. He holds a 6th-degree black belt in Aikido.

Dr. Michael Genesereth is best known for his work on computational logic and applications of that work in enterprise management and electronic commerce. Basic research interests include knowledge representation, automated reasoning, and rational action. Current projects include logical spreadsheets, data, and service integration on the World Wide Web, and computational law.

Dr. Vinay K. Chaudhri is a program director in the Artificial Intelligence (AI) Center at SRI International. His research focuses on the science and engineering of large knowledge base systems and spans knowledge representation and reasoning, question answering, knowledge acquisition, and innovative applications. His most recent work has been on creating an intelligent textbook in biology that answers a student’s questions and leads to significant learning gains. He has co-edited a volume on the Theory and Application of conceptual modeling, and two special issues of AI Magazine — one on Question Answering Systems, and another on Application of AI to Contemporary and Emerging Education Challenges. He has taught a course on Knowledge Representation and Reasoning at Stanford University. 

He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from University of Toronto where he was a Connaught Scholar and a Fellow of Massey College. He also holds a Masters in Industrial and Management Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur , and a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra.

Authentic Student Talk II

Extending the Stanford Teaching Festival Experience
Course Objective: 

Course Objective: By April 2017, participants will be equipped with the pedagogical moves to have their students independently facilitate a rigorous, text-based, and authentic student-centered discussion.

REGISTER

In June, the Stanford Teaching Festival participants in the Authentic Student Talk course had the opportunity to consider the different ways to engage students in authentic discourse in a classroom setting.  We learned collectively that at the heart of a student-centered classroom learners talk with each other to make meaning. This school-year course will build on the summer experience by inviting teachers to capture video of their classroom discussions and share them throughout the year in a lab-style setting. Teachers will analyze their videos through the lens of “talk and facilitation moves” and set goals throughout the year to improve the quality of discussion in their classrooms among students and the teacher.

Keywords: Speaking and Listening Standards, facilitating discussion, Common Core, ELA 6-12

Audience: 2016 Stanford Teaching Festival Authentic Student Talkparticipants 

Dates & Times:

  • 19 Oct 2016, 5 - 7 PM
  • TBD Nov (virtual - date/time decided by teacher pairs)
  • 25 Jan 2017, 5 - 7 PM
  • TBD Feb (virtual - date/time decided by teacher pairs)
  • 22 Mar 2017, 5 - 7 PM

Format of Course: From October 2016- March 2017, there will be three in-person class meetings and two virtual meetings. Teachers will be able to join the in-person sessions virtually if unable to attend in person.

Cost: 

  • $250 (Individual)
  • $200 (Group - 3 or more teachers from the same school or district) 
Units: 1 Status: Open
Course Facilitators: 

Melissa Scheve Ms. Scheve’s work focuses on working with the CSET faculty and staff to develop and implement the Hollyhock Fellowship program with an emphasis on providing summer professional development and school year support for the high school teachers chosen as Hollyhock Center Fellows. Her background includes extensive experience teaching high school ELA in rural, private, suburban, and most recently, urban contexts; serving as an ELA department chair and mentor teacher; and leading curriculum and professional development sessions for a network of charter schools. She holds a BS in secondary English education from Kansas State University, an MA in English from the University of Kansas, and  National Board Teacher Certification since 1998. mscheve@stanford.edu

Jamie Gepner

Why I teach: 
I love helping students see their potential and reach toward it.  Being a part of their growth as a person and student is special.

What I like doing when I’m not inspiring kids:
When I'm not teaching, I spend a lot of time coaching.  In my actual free time, I love playing or watching sports and cooking with my husband.

Staci Johnson

Why I teach: 
I get to spend my day with hilarious, deep-thinking, generous people who are actively trying to figure out how they fit into this world. I get to play a part in the pushing and pulling and provoking that will determine how they understand themselves, their society and their ability to act upon the world.

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